About

In the heart of Kingston, Jamaica, not the tourist spot, but the blood and grit and soul of inner city Kingston where poverty and affluence co-exist in a type of harmonious controversy that changes by the hour, lives DownSound Records (“DSR”). Led by entrepreneur Josef Bogdanovich, DSR has come up like a rose through the broken concrete to become one of the most successful Jamaican entertainment companies for developing new talent to emerge over the last couple decades.

After years in the game DSR is now ready to export its own brand of Jamaican musical authenticity for world consumption. DSR is a media savvy entertainment company that understands the importance of full integration of social media, digital content distribution, terrestrial marketing, long tail plays and brand building.

Kingston Signals is a subsidiary of Downsound Records based in Kingston, Jamaica. We’re a production company specialising in Jamaica-related content and brands.

Subscribe to our Soundcloud page for archived recordings.

 At first, Kingston Signals began by broadcasting from locations around the city, often by splicing into any available phone line (telephone poles, a nearby shop or residence) and sending a single 56K (or 28k) audio stream to a server located in Los Angeles that echoed the signal onto a T3 connection.

Initially, the nature of the program was tiring and extremely unpredictable. The equipment would often be rained on or soundmen would get drunk and trip over the wires – replacing the live stream with a static hum or the sound of an orphaned plug scraping along the ground.

After about six broadcasts, Kingston Signals moved into the basement of Globe Furniture at 80 Constant Spring Road where Downsound’s studio and dubroom were then located, and the rest, as they say, was dancehall history.

In its two-year stint, Kingston Signals pioneered Jamaican music on the web in a way that has been often imitated but never duplicated. It was an exciting time to be online and the program provided a raw, uncensored view into not only the relentless energy of Dancehall and Reggae music, but also an authentic glimpse into the lifestyle and imagery of modern Jamaica.

The program hosted and profiled the greatest that Jamaican music had to offer. From the younger sounds like Coppershot spinning tracks for a pre-famous Sean Paul, to veterans like U-Roy and King Yellowman performing live on King Stur Gav, Kingston Signals used technology in ways that truly communicated the multiplicity and energy of Jamaican music.

In 2002 Downsound moved from its Constant Spring address to its current location at St. Andrew Park (the former home of Dave Kelly’s Madhouse Records) and Kingston Signals hosted its last webcast.